2015 March Photograph of the Month: Epic Sense of Scale

The photograph of the month for March 2015 was shot during one of the last zodiac cruises on my 2013 Antarctica expedition. We were fortunate to come across an iceberg of truly monumental size near the entrance to Antarctic Sound. Whilst I have been fortunate to see and photograph icebergs even larger than this (and the biggest icebergs are measured in kilometres) this particular iceberg also had an incredible chasm, wonderful form and shape and beautifully chiselled features. Our expedition ship ‘Polar Pioneer’ pictured here is seventy two metres long and a full six decks high at the fly bridge.  This was actually one giant iceberg joined underneath the water.  Our ship could have easily fit through the chasm however such a venture would have been exceedingly dangerous. I admit though my mind was racing with the thought of a blast through this chasm in our zodiac! VPPY - Gold AwardDon’t forget! You can win a free 13″ x 19″ Win a Fine art Print of this photograph including shipping anywhere in the world. All you need do is to be the first to comment on this post on the home page with your thoughts on why you like this photograph or why you would like to own a print of the image and then share the post with your preferred social media outlet. Just keep in mind that due to my hectic travel schedule it may take me some time to make and post out each print so if you are the lucky winner for a given month I ask that you jut exercise a little patience and as soon as I am back in my studio in Australia and as soon as practical I will make the print and send it to you – free of charge. Each print will be made and personally signed by me with the same care and attention to detail I exercise on my large gallery prints. There will be a total of twelve prints to win throughout the calendar year. The first two prints of the year were won by Fred Jennings and Chris Roberts and their prints have now been delivered, framed by them and are hanging on their walls.

This particular print is one I hold quite close to my heart as it won a coveted Gold Award at both the 2014 VPPY Victorian Professional Photography Awards and also at the National APPA Australian Professional Photography Awards. It was one of my four portfolio photographs that won me the 2014 Australian Canon Science, Nature and Environment Photographer of the Year award.

Good luck and don’t forget in order to win the print you need to be the first to comment here on the home page on the March photograph of the Month for the 2015 calendar year with your thoughts on why you like the photograph or why you would like to own a print and to then share the post with your social media outlet of choice.

21 thoughts on “2015 March Photograph of the Month: Epic Sense of Scale

  1. That is a truly spectacular image! I’ve been to Antarctica only once, but it’s captured my heart and I know I’ll be back.

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  2. This is a fantastic image and I recall our Antarctica trip in 2014 where I was hoping to see something similar. Alas I didn’t but we did see magnificent icebergs.
    As a reminder of Antarctica and Polar Pioneer I’d love to have this image on my wall!

    Brian Peters

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  3. I love the way it looks like some God or very large being literally took to it with a chisel, as though it was a vast abandoned sculpture. The contrast between the powdered ice and the flat surfaces just adds to that illusion. The ship of course makes you instantly aware of just how big it is.

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  4. I absolutely love this photograph for the sense of space that it evokes and for the lighting cast on the iceberg. I would love to have this in print hanging on the gallery wall of my new home and let it serve as a reminder that I need to make a trip to Antarctica one day soon.

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  5. Another amazing picture. I have trouble imagining the actual size of this iceberg. The ship appears so insignificant in the scene. Thank you for sharing, because I know I’ll never get to see anything like this in person. Great work of course.

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  6. Well, i’m not sure what happened to my original comment. I love this, the size of the ship appears to be insignificant against that iceberg. I have no idea how it would feel to be up against anything that enormous. I would love to have a photo like this in my home, perhaps it could continue to inspire me. I would love to visit a place like this but can never imagine that happening in this life. thank you so much for sharing and to the winner of the photo, lucky you and enjoy.

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  7. I love the sense of scale in this image, I know how big those ships are and it looks so tiny and insignificant against the icebergs

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  8. Such a wonderful photo, and again showing the timeless wonder of the Antartic. I always wonder about the events of the past when I see icebergs and the thousands of years that they have witnessed of the past. Including the ship adds to the immense scale of this time and the great size. This photo would look great hanging beside the oher print.
    Great photo.
    Fred

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  9. I believe I was on the trip when you made this image. It is spectacular! It is difficult to grasp the enormity of the ice in front of your eyes. Its height and width is tremendous, and yet pristine. We looked at this huge iceberg for quite a while and still it was awesome.

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  10. Truly inspiring. As if the above-water immensity weren’t enough, to follow those cleave lines down deep below the ocean surface – with the Polar Pioneer serving as a yardstick – gives one a sense of the true sense of proportion here. It’s enough to give me chills.

    I’m a recent subscriber to your blog, Joshua, and I must say, your ability to convey the beauty of icebergs is astounding. Some rhetorical musings: What is it about icebergs that seems to inspire such wonder? Their remoteness? Their solitude that borders on poetic symbolism? Their jagged, electric outlines that seem to rip from the eternal ocean surface? And these are what I gather from your photographs alone…one day I need to see them with my own eyes.

    -Greg Kester

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  11. The mood and colour of this photograph is rather melancholoy. The iceberg reminds me of a dinosaur and the right hand side of it even resembles a face. The tiny boat is reminiscent of man’s presence during the age of the dinosaurs. Whatever the reason, global warming or other, the icebergs are disappearing… going the way of the dinosaurs. The sun seems to highlight it’s wonderful features. They are both beautiful, powerful and magnificent. To me, it would be a beautiful tribute, to both the animal and the iceberg, that I would love to put on my wall and share with everyone who visits my home.

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  12. It is impossible to describe the vastness in Antarctica. This image captures the “foreverness” with no explanation needed. For me, particularly, it would be a memento of a first for me.

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  13. This to me sums up the grandeur of Antarctica. It’s vastness and isolation, where man’s influence is minimal.
    Having been aboard the Polar Pioneer myself I would love to hang this on my wall to remind me of my travels in it in Antarctica. I have a real soft spot for the PP and am sad to think that I may never travel in it again.
    Great memories summed up in one picture.

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  14. What a stunning photograph, it took a while to get an idea of the scale until I realised that the ship you referred to is in the centre of the chasm. I wonder how far away you were to get such a field of view. The almost symmetrical curve to the top of the berg gives the photo a nice balance I think. Beautiful image Joshua.

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  15. This is so awesome! I can’t get over how immense this iceberg is. It makes the ship look so tiny. Hopefully one day I will have the opportunity to see something like this myself. Great photography!

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